“What is striking about biking is not that it solves any particular problem but, instead, that it is part of the solution to several.” —

J. Harry Wray

Thursday, 20 October 2011

Build It And They WILL Come

AND DON'T, EVER, EVER, SAY IT CAN'T BE DONE.



Read David Hembrow's blog post. I don't need to say any more. Thank you David.

Except:

WAKE UP BRITAIN.

IT'S NOTHING TO DO WITH "CULTURAL DIFFERENCES", HILLS OR THE WEATHER.

STOP MAKING EXCUSES AND FFS GET ON WITH IT.

(No apologies for "shouting". It's my blog and I'll shout if I want to. So there.) ;-)

3 comments:

Andy in Germany said...

Agreed, I could say the same of south Germany, but I think that there are too many vested interests who want to keep the status quo as it is.
I still think hills are a problem though, partly psycologically with people being daunted by them, partly because it costs more to build infrstructure in hilly places.

amcambike said...

They built it, but they did not come.

Dr. C said...

I'd take amcambike's posts with a tablespoon of salt. Build it and they will come is a bit of an oversimplification, but the fact that The Netherlands did build their cycle infrastructure is the single biggest reason that cycling didn't decline there as it did here. The argument for the importance of a mysterious "cycling culture" unique to The Netherlands is demonstrably pish, cycling rates in the UK were immense within living memory (just) and declined to the current basal level. Is some mysterious "cycle culture" which existed in The Netherlands at this time but not in the UK the reason for the differences in cycling rates between the two now? Obviously it is not, the decline was stopped by re-designing the road network in The Netherlands which is something which did not happen here. These points are difficult to raise on amcambike's blog due to the use of selective comment moderation.